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Book-collecting: not much point ?

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Or maybe there is:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-tayside-central-22502341

Paul


Book collecting takes patience and a lot of disposable funds, plus you need to know what you're doing.

Edited by: B-C Books on May 13, 2013 11:10 AM


Not just books , it seems odd to me to collect/ hoard £230,000 worth of anything

A few postcards or stamps or ladybird books yes , even the odd Picasso print , something to give one pleasure , but not things worth a life changing amount of money


The point is that they were not worth that amount when the collector bought them
and undoubtedly gave him pleasure.

What about the cars that every wealthy person seems to collect in multiples
(and rarely hold their price)?


Stephen Whitaker wrote:
The point is that they were not worth that amount when the collector bought them
and undoubtedly gave him pleasure.

What about the cars that every wealthy person seems to collect in multiples
(and rarely hold their price)?



I don't think you do quite understand the collecting bug if you imagine that someone can have that bug and also think of other uses for the money a collection might realise if sold.

The world's best-selling wine writer, Hugh Johnson, sold off his private cellar today, after half a century of collecting and he struggled to let go. He's moving to much smaller premises but;
"I shouldn't be selling them," he said referring to a pair of magnums of Chablis waiting to go under the hammer in an Essex auction room. "I don't want to look. You see, when I look at the bottles I know exactly how they will taste."

Obsessions often exclude most things other than the basic requirements of existence.



Stephen Whitaker wrote:
I don't think you do quite understand the collecting bug if you imagine that someone can have that bug and also think of other uses for the money a collection might realise if sold.

The world's best-selling wine writer, Hugh Johnson, sold off his private cellar today, after half a century of collecting and he struggled to let go. He's moving to much smaller premises but;
"I shouldn't be selling them," he said referring to a pair of magnums of Chablis waiting to go under the hammer in an Essex auction room. "I don't want to look. You see, when I look at the bottles I know exactly how they will taste."

Obsessions often exclude most things other than the basic requirements of existence.



There are many different types of collector. The two most common are probably:

a) the obsessive, who has become hooked on some subject. There are some really weird ones out there, things like people who collect sachets of sugar.

b) the investor, who aims to make a profit, either for their own retirement or as an inheritance to pass on.

Some may manage to combine both. The purpose of the collecting will influence the way in which the collector goes about their business. As shown by our Scottish teacher, you don't necessarily need a huge income. Although if you are Charles Saatchi, your collecting can influence the markets in which you are operating.

I suspect it is harder to put together a decent book collection than it used to be. The internet may have made it easier to track down books of interest. But that also means that where books are in demand, prices will be higher than in the days when you could nip down to your local secondhand bookshop. My father, who taught English at the University in Belfast, was a collector of literary fiction and literary criticism. He started whilst a student at Oxford, running up accounts at Blackwells and many other bookshops. One of his wedding presents when he married my mother was to have his Blackwells account paid off for him. My mother tells a story of my father going to a book stall at a market in central Belfast soon after we moved here in 1965. Books were 6d each. My father rooted through them and found a few of interest, among them a T S Eliot 1st edition. The stallholder homed in on this one. "Aha, this one is a bit special, you can't have it for sixpence. This one will be a shilling." Even in the mid 60s it was probably worth several pounds. There are now a lot fewer of that kind of bookseller.

Paul


Bruce was a very regular visitor (weekly at least!) to the shop I used to have. He loved his books and was very very proud of his collection. He was a lover of literature as well as the physical entity of the book and I reckon had probably read most of his collection. I sold some of his "cheaper" books for him - including a 1st edition of "The Jungle Book", some Ian Rankin signed first editions and a first UK printing of "Uncle Tom's Cabin".
He was very knowledgable and very happy to pass his knowledge on to others (well, me anyway!).
A lovely man...I shall miss him.


He has also cleared out some of his book collection. I have a couple with his exlibris bookplate.


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