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Shipping to multiple Amazon locations

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I am new to FBA.

When I prepared my first shipment to Amazon yesterday, it asked me to ship to two different locations. The strange thing is that it wasn't divided evenly as they asked me to ship 90% of my items to one while the remaining 10% to the other. I manually modified the quantity of units so all of my items are shipped to the first location where Amazon already assigned 90% of my items and deleted the 10% shipment.

Do you think there will be a problem?

It cost me about $10 to ship to the first location (90%) and $8 to the second (10%) so it didn't make sense to me.


Do you think there will be a problem?


davido84 wrote:
Yes, this will be a problem. Changing quantities in order to change the shipping destination is not allowed. If Amazon thinks you are doing this they will close your FBA account. They may or may not give you a warning. The software should not even let you change quantities by more than 5% without making you start over.


davido84 wrote:
Do you think there will be a problem?


Hi,

I have read posts and threads by sellers that did this and received a warning and had to schedule a call with FBA regarding this issue.

Unfortunately, many or none that I saw, ever came back to report after they posted their thread.

I have been able to add units by one or two on a "one warehouse" shipment but it is frowned upon to do that and cancel another shipment to another warehouse.

It is understandably hard and frustrating for FBA sellers with multiple warehouses being involved now.

I tried to set up a shipment today but it was being split to four different warehouses, (including a new one for me in SC that I hadn't been involved with before.) I just gave up and will try to fill the shipments as items in FBA run out of stock.

Between this issue, the higher fees this year and the intense competition, I'm ready to give up on FBA when my inventory in house for FBA use is depleted.

It was fun while it lasted though, but it isn't fun anymore. :(

Gail


Gail,
I had the "phone call" with Amazon FBA a few months ago. They explained to me what I was doing wrong and what the next stages of the problem resolution would be if I didn't change my ways. Of course, the ultimate consequence would have been loss of FBA privileges. So, now you know someone who has survived the "phone call".


george the wonder frog wrote:
Gail,
I had the "phone call" with Amazon FBA a few months ago. They explained to me what I was doing wrong and what the next stages of the problem resolution would be if I didn't change my ways. Of course, the ultimate consequence would have been loss of FBA privileges. So, now you know someone who has survived the "phone call".


paintcreekbooks wrote:
but I'm re-thinking about even using FBA very much in the future.


Just curious, why would a seller not want to use FBA when they sell on Amazon?


davido84,

I agree with most of your points. There are 2 things that I want to add:

"3. Amazon will gladly accept returns from your customers well past the 30 day window. I once received a return nearly 4 months after the purchase. With FBA, your inventory is never really sold. It's only on indefinite rental until the buyer returns it." Also, FBA return rules encourage customers to return things as "defective" or "not as described" or other designations that result in Amazon classifying the product as "unfulfillable". These pieces all have to be returned to us and resent to FBA because they aren't damaged at all. Tremendous (unnecessary) costs involved.

"7. You'll need to hire a staff of accountants to keep track of all the sales taxes you must collect and remit for every state in which Amazon has a warehouse." The jury is still out on this. Just because Amazon has a warehouse in a state doesn't mean we have to charge sales tax in that state. Just because PA says it's so, doesn't make it so. And if the sales tax does need to be collected, you can pay Amazon 2.5% to do it for you. Of course you would also have to pay someone to file and remit for each state.


I agree on #7. My guess is very few sellers collect sales tax in all states where their inventory passes through. It was more popular when there were only 2 or 3 states with FBA warehouses...


Those are all very good reasons to NOT use FBA. However, when you have competitors who do use FBA, your sales drop significantly as you never win the BB and majority of buyers don't dig deeper when choosing a seller to buy from.

Which goes back to my original point that if you plan on selling on Amazon, you are almost forced to do FBA.


I agree with you here also. I just wish that either Amazon, Congress, or the Supreme Court would throw us a bone with regard to this issue and give us some guidance.

Of course the state governments will say we have a nexus if we have have a single $2 book in their state, but they have a huge conflict of interest.

Really, what Amazon should do is collect and remit the sales tax for FBA orders BY DEFAULT to any state it think it thinks it should do this for. After all, who is better to able to remit sales tax, Amazon, or your Aunt Sally who has $100 worth of book inventory stored in PA?

If Amazon did this, we could then opt OUT of this default sales tax remittance if we wanted to do it ourselves for a particular state, like our home state. If we opted out for a state, Amazon could still collect it for that state, but we would remit it ourselves. But the other 49 states would be Amazon's problem.

Problem solved, no hassle. Which is why Amazon will never do this.


Which goes back to my original point that if you plan on selling on Amazon, you are almost forced to do FBA.


Taiji wrote:
paintcreekbooks wrote:
but I'm re-thinking about even using FBA very much in the future.


')