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Help! Weight Input in shipping packages HELP!

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Hi all,
I am relatively new to FBA selling and I was wondering what the importance of inputting what the weight of my package is when I'm sending it to amazon.

It seems like it wouldn't matter if I put 1 lb or 15 lb because amazon reviews this when it reaches their storage right?

also, why is the option of voiding shipping charges available? and in which situation would i want to use it?

do they refund me if the box is lighter than what i put it as? do they charge me more if its more?

so far i have been putting all my packages as 1 lb, even if they're heavier or lighter than that. Is it recommended that I get a scale? please help! any input will help!

I appreciate it. View the reply MrMauxi selected as correct



Well the weight is how the shipper decides how much to charge so it is important.
Weigh the package .... don't just put in 1 lb.

BRB but wanted to get that to you fast !!

Edited by: Oneida Books on Sep 2, 2012 8:43 PM

MrMauxi wrote:
because amazon reviews this when it reaches their storage right?


Hi,

It is very important to put in the correct weight as that is the shipping charge that reflects in your Payments accounts for a deduction for transportation charges for FBA shipments.

Most of my boxes are larger and heavier than my digital scale on my desk can handle.

What I've been doing is using a bathroom digital scale that is fairly accurate. I weigh myself first, and then weigh myself holding the box and deduct my weight to get a fairly accurate estimate for the weight.

When I drop off my boxes at my local UPS store, they are put on a scale and weighed there also and I check to see if the weight comes up the same.

I'm not sure if it is at this point or some other point where the "official" weight is entered, but you need to try to be correct in your estimate for the weight.

Gail


Regarding why you might want to void shipping charges...

If you have a multiple warehouse shipment to two warehouses, for instance, IND1 and PHX, when you see the shipping charge to PHX as opposed to IND1, (if you live in the Midwest), you might want to void the shipping charges to PHX and cancel/delete the shipment.

Gail


Entering 1lb for each box is certainly a way to reduce your shipping costs (why didn't I think of this?!) -- until you are caught and the box gets sent back to you.

I use an ordinary digital bathroom scale to weight boxes and it works fine. You can also purchase a postal scale than can weight heavy items, of course.

Edited by: davido84 on Sep 2, 2012 6:52 PM


It really doesn't matter what weight you input into your order- these are merely shipping price ESTIMATES that are deducted from your account. When the box arrives at a FBA center, Amazon will know how much the item actually weights and then charge your account for the difference (if you underestimated the weight). If you overestimated the weight, you do NOT get refunded...so in actuality, it is better to underestimate the weight and simply let Amazon charge you whatever difference exists, because there is no getting a refund doing it the other way.

Also, I am referring to UPS shipments.

Edited by: Numero Uno Deals on Sep 4, 2012 11:28 AM


You are correct- Amazon WILL review it when it reaches storage and will charge your account accordingly no matter what weight you initially put on the box. If you put 1 lb when it is 40 lbs, they wil charge you for the 40 lbs. But if you put 80 lbs when it is 40 lbs, they will NOT refund you for the excess you paid. So if you are off on your estimates, always be sure to underestimate.


I'm curious as to how many shipments you have used this strategy on ?

HELP says to accurately weigh and measure. I'm not so sure I want to try to find out how they feel about consistently under weighing boxes on UPS partnered shipments ......


I wouldn't recommend this strategy either, since as you said it appears to be a violation of Amazon's shipping directions.

From the FBA Shipping Manual:

If you are using an Amazon-Partnered carrier, accurately weigh and measure boxes and pallets to ensure that the correct values are supplied for every shipment.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?ie=UTF8&nodeId=200243260


I'm not advocating using improper estimates either...I am simply stating that if you are off a pound or so based on a scale that you find may not be accurate, it would be wiser to error on the side of underestimating. I used the "1 lb when it is actually 40 lbs example" as clearly an extreme example that I would never employ...I was more or less saying that if a box weighs 30 lbs and you put 29 pounds because your scale may not be accurate, it is better than stating 31 lbs.

Edited by: Numero Uno Deals on Sep 4, 2012 3:48 PM


My understanding here is that the only party to which the actual weight matters is UPS. UPS weighs all packages at some point while en-route to their destination.

For comparison, I use Fedex for some packages I ship directly to customers. I could put one pound on every package if I wanted, since Fedex charges only based on the weight of the package when weighed at one of their facilities (or at least this is how it is supposed to work). I imagine UPS is similar.

FBA (the warehouse) could care less what the package weighs when it arrives at the warehouse versus what the shipping label says it weighs. Most likely, amazon isn't charged for the package until UPS weighs it, therefore if they are being charged an amount that differs from what you paid they would charge you the difference in the form of some sort of adjustment in your payment transactions.

I imagine there's a system setup on Amazon's end where if the estimate you pay is off by a large enough amount, say $2.00 for example, that you will automatically be billed the difference. I don't weigh any packages I send through FBA and I have sent hundreds. I just guess, and if its off.. oh well.


I imagine there's a system setup on Amazon's end where if the estimate you pay is off by a large enough amount, say $2.00 for example, that you will automatically be billed the difference. I don't weigh any packages I send through FBA and I have sent hundreds. I just guess, and if its off.. oh well.


Two reasons. I don't own a scale that can weigh packages over 10lbs and I don't intend to buy one. I also ship at least 1/3 of my packages away from home where I don't have access to a scale.

UPS doesn't require senders to weigh pre-paid packages. If Amazon was to start penalizing sellers for not accurately weighing inbound shipments that would just be dumb.

For what its worth, it also says that when you generate a label these costs are estimates and that actual charges will be based on UPS's weight/measurements/shipping location.. or something to that effect.


ishortem wrote:
Two reasons. I don't own a scale that can weigh packages over 10lbs and I don't intend to buy one. I also ship at least 1/3 of my packages away from home where I don't have access to a scale.

UPS doesn't require senders to weigh pre-paid packages. If Amazon was to start penalizing sellers for not accurately weighing inbound shipments that would just be dumb.

For what its worth, it also says that when you generate a label these costs are estimates and that actual charges will be based on UPS's weight/measurements/shipping location.. or something to that effect.



I appreciate your suggestion, but currently I don't own any scale except for the 10lb scale. I only use that for packages going USPS since you pay upfront. With Fedex you don't get billed until they weigh the package, so I don't usually weigh those.

I believe the quote by david from the FBA manual is more of a recommendation then a requirement. I would be very surprised if FBA mandated accurately weighing boxes prior to shipping (aside from those that are near the 50lb mark). Most boxes I ship are between 20-30lbs.

As FBA has changed, I have been shipping less and less from home and more when I'm out of town and it makes more financial sense to ship it to FBA rather than home.


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